weeklyvidrecs:

Keep Your Picture Clear - Pacific Rim (by kaydee falls)

Newt’s learning how to see more clearly, which isn’t always that much fun.

Warnings: some fast cuts including very rapid flickering images; not worse than the movie itself

souridealist:

copperbadge:

theactualcluegirl:

emmagrant01:

moonblossom:

kmaryarty:

persian-slipper:

camwyn:

perspicaciousembroiderist:

voodoo-tiki:

Oh great, I’m an MNU bureaucrat. Or a prawn.

I’m the village witch! I get to fly around on a broom and have a smart-alek black cat for my best friend!

I’m a small-town frontier sheriff. In a town populated mostly by lizards, rodents, and other various desert creatures.

I’m Captain America.
…
Well, shit.

A young peasant maid working in the house of painter, to become his talented assistant and the model for one of his most famous works.

A mutant.

I’m five plucky talking golden retriever puppies, then.

Oh fuck… the last movie I watched was Snowpiercer. So I guess I have to be the one to nut the naked Emperor, get my friends killed, destroy the world as we know it, and die for the cause now. Um… you’re welcome?(@copperbadge, I blame you.) (Again.) (Still)

HAHAHAHAHA do documentaries count, because if so I’m John motherFucking Kennedy. (It was a very biased documentary.)

Oh fuck Lady Cordelia Vorkosigan nee Naismith has had like eighty-seven jobs and I am not equipped for a single one of them

Jaeger pilot. I like it.

souridealist:

copperbadge:

theactualcluegirl:

emmagrant01:

moonblossom:

kmaryarty:

persian-slipper:

camwyn:

perspicaciousembroiderist:

voodoo-tiki:

Oh great, I’m an MNU bureaucrat. Or a prawn.

I’m the village witch! I get to fly around on a broom and have a smart-alek black cat for my best friend!

I’m a small-town frontier sheriff. In a town populated mostly by lizards, rodents, and other various desert creatures.

I’m Captain America.

Well, shit.

A young peasant maid working in the house of painter, to become his talented assistant and the model for one of his most famous works.

A mutant.

I’m five plucky talking golden retriever puppies, then.

Oh fuck… the last movie I watched was Snowpiercer. So I guess I have to be the one to nut the naked Emperor, get my friends killed, destroy the world as we know it, and die for the cause now. Um… you’re welcome?
(@copperbadge, I blame you.) (Again.) (Still)

HAHAHAHAHA do documentaries count, because if so I’m John motherFucking Kennedy. (It was a very biased documentary.)

Oh fuck Lady Cordelia Vorkosigan nee Naismith has had like eighty-seven jobs and I am not equipped for a single one of them

Jaeger pilot. I like it.

disabledsuperheroes:

kittenskysong:

DisabilityFest
┕ Nick Fury 
Nick Fury Sr. (Marvel 616)
Nick Fury Jr. AKA Marcus Johnson (Marvel 616)
Nick Fury (MCU)
Nick Fury (Ultimates)

[image description: A photoset of Nick Fury as he appears in the different Marvel Universes.]

disabledsuperheroes:

kittenskysong:

DisabilityFest

┕ Nick Fury 

Nick Fury Sr. (Marvel 616)

Nick Fury Jr. AKA Marcus Johnson (Marvel 616)

Nick Fury (MCU)

Nick Fury (Ultimates)

[image description: A photoset of Nick Fury as he appears in the different Marvel Universes.]

swanjolras:

like tbh i feel like my problem with the “dark and gritty!!” trend in modern stories is this

there’s this idea in our culture that cynicism is realistic? that only children believe in happy endings, that people are ultimately selfish and greedy and seeing with clear eyes means seeing the world as an awful place

that idealism is— easy, i guess. butterflies and sunshine and love are easy things to have in your head.

but i’ve known since i was fifteen that idealism— faith in humanity— optimism— is the most difficult thing in the entire world.

i constantly struggle to have faith in humanity, because it’s really, really easy to lose it. it’s easy to look at the news and go “what were you expecting? of course humans behave this way.” it’s easy to see the world and go “ugh, there’s no hope there.” and the years when i believed that were easy. miserable— but easy.

it is hard work to see the good in people. it is hard work to hope. it is hard work to keep faith and love and joy and appreciation for beauty in my daily life.

and when moviemakers and tv producers and writers go “omg!!! all characters are selfish and act poorly and don’t love each other, nothing ever happens that is happy or good, that’s so much more realistic, that’s so much more adult”

no, it’s not

it’s childish.

it’s the most childish thing i can imagine.

themindislimitless:

thingsthatmakeyouacey:

bessibels:

Soooo this post and all the white aces commenting on it are wrong and also racist and here’s why:

First of all, how is it that white aces are all about diverse perspectives and multiple narratives when we’re co-opting WOC ideas to demand inclusivity from feminist and sex positive spaces, but as soon as POC perspectives start challenging mainstream narratives within our own community, all of a sudden anything that doesn’t fit the mold is irrelevant and off-topic? We’re a bunch of racist hypocrites, folks.

Second of all, here’s *my* takeaway from Alok Vaid-Menon’s piece, and it’s a point all us white aces have been failing to articulate or acknowledge:

If one of the goals of an asexual visibility movement is to make asexual identities accessible, then we need to address all of the barriers to that. Right now we’re addressing some of them, like stigma and lack of vocabulary and erasure. But we’re not addressing colonialism. We’re not addressing the fact that structurally, people who have been racially desexualized just do not have the same access to an asexual identity that white people do. That makes racism and decolonization central issues for us. If we’re not addressing them, we’re only helping white people and POC who are able to adopt white-compatible narratives. If we’re not addressing that, we’re a racially exclusive movement. *That’s* the point. *That’s* why it’s crucial to talk about colonialism and desexualization and lack of access to ace identities.

People are like “How is this relevant when the person doesn’t even identify as ace?” You don’t get it. It’s relevant because they can’t identify as ace in an empowering way, and no one in our community is talking about why.

It’s also crucial to discuss colonialism because desexualizing is an issue the “ace community” has the power to challenge. Ace PoC have an immense power to discuss how colonialism = co-opting and sexual enslavement of brown bodies, and to fight this structure through actual movements instead of just trying to be included - and white people can’t wrap their minds around letting us do that, or that they’re not gatekeepers to “let” things happen in the first place.

Dear Lord, that quoted piece pretty much sums up why I’m so reluctant to identify as asexual (especially as an Asian women who also wears a headscarf…double desexualization wrapped in “submissive object” for white stereotypes). And those comments. The comments are so frustrating.

One of the most frustrating parts is perhaps the comparison of racialized sexualization/desexualization with the conflagration of abuse/assault. They are not the same thing. Interactions with both these pieces can coexist together and have different effects (there’s brown asexual women who have been assaulted— I want to hear what they say though, to be honest). Race is visible and as intrinsic in daily interactions (not simply that of when “fucking” is brought up) for brown and black women that it shapes the very idea/thinking of sexuality to begin with. What does it mean to be asexual for a black women who is constantly hypersexualized, and how alienating is it to have her asexuality negated (sometimes even by the ace community) because she is constantly seen as “sexual”? How does it affect a brown/black woman who dons a headscarf and are coded desexualized and coded “asexual” regardless of how they feel about it, where conversations about sex are seen as out-of-the-norm, while simultaneously all brown/black women (even those who wear a headscarf) are coded a “freak in bed” (yay for stereotypes, amirite) and the dissuasion of talk of sex at—and I mean at, like at an object— them is written off as “modesty” instead of both a challenge of racialized sexism and a negation of their asexuality?

It goes on. East Asian women coded as submissive, like she said, Asian women’s coding as “submissive” and having it automatically coded “asexual” (even by people in the asexual community, because just because you are queer does not mean you are incapable of being racist), with communities having to establish that they have sexuality so many times over that it feels like a betrayal of community when an individual is asexual. These are challenges unique to brown/black communities, but they are inherently part of the course of asexuality politics that cannot be ignored.

roachpatrol:

voxclara:

savanna:

roman-numerals:

yiffstrider:

amporeon:

terraparticle:

amporeon:

IMPORTANT: So they had these cards in the women’s restrooms at this doctor’s office that I was at. I’m really happy that they put them in there because it makes it easier for a woman to escape an abusive relationship without the abuser expecting anything. It gives me hope when I see things like this.

Oh yes, because women are never abusers.

I never said that they can’t/ aren’t. I’m well aware that some women are. I was just trying to talk about a positive thing that I found in a restroom. Don’t turn my post into something that it’s not. God fucking damn it, it’s like you can’t talk about something positive on this site without someone trying to ruin it or twist the original posters words.

Thank you so much for the positive post, and the VERY true words at the asshole commenting on your post. This is the exact reason why I don’t like this website sometimes. Christ.

If you have to qualify Situation A with “but Situation B happens, too,” do you actually give a shit about Situation B? Or are you looking for ways to derail Situation A?

^

40% of domestic violence is experienced by men, do you suppose they also put these cards in the men’s restroom?

Wouldn’t seeing these cards in the restroom alert abusers that there were probably the same cards in the other gender restroom, possibly making them more violent and cutting off their partner even more from resources that could help them?

This seems ill thought out. Unless, of course, they are only in the women’s restroom. In which case they are ignoring 40% of domestic violence victims. I wonder why.

getting really tired of this 40% myth and how frequently everyone scrambles to believe it because they want to look reasonable and fair.

While some people may believe that there is a higher reported incidence of women experiencing violence by their male partners due to men underreporting when they are victims, the reality is the opposite. In 2008, 72 percent of the intimate partner violence against males and 49 percent of the intimate partner violence against females was reported to police.Catalano, Smith, Snyder, & Rand (2009). Bureau of Justice Statistics Selected Findings: Female Victims of Domestic Violence. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, NCJ 228356.

Researcher Elspeth McInnes…  recounts some of her research that showed that when men talked about women’s violence against men, some cited abuse as not having a hot meal on the table, not having the children bathed before bed, or women spending money on gambling or shopping. At the more severe end of the spectrum, they nominated verbal and emotional violence as abuse. Then, a tiny minority documented physical abuse, and an even smaller minority named sexual abuse. 

“Women were talking about being run over, being drugged and raped at knifepoint, having their children dangled over high rise balconies till they did as they were told and of course you get verbal and emotional violence,” says McInnes. “When we were talking about physical violence against men, one of the worst examples was that she banged his head with the cupboard door – which isn’t good – but the sheer level of fear, harm and terror that women talked about was simply not present in what the men’s data showed.” 

The vast majority of domestic assaults are committed by men. Even when men are victimized, 10% are assaulted by another man. In contrast, only 2% of women who are victimized are assaulted by another woman.2

Two studies have found that at least 40% of police officer families experience domestic violence, (1, 2) in contrast to 10% of families in the general population.(3) A third study of older and more experienced officers found a rate of 24% (4), indicating that domestic violence is 2-4 times more common among police families than American families in general.

in conclusion while domestic abuse hotlines in men’s bathrooms would be great too, women are the majority of victims of violent, life-threatening domestic abuse by a lot more than 40%, and men are still the majority of perpetrators of violent, life threatening domestic abuse, even to other men and boys. this is not a remotely equivalent situation.

using abused men and boys to prop up the myth that women abuse men right back nearly as much is toxic, abhorrent nonsense. we need to cut it the fuck out. 

I could not stay behind you: my desire,
More sharp than filed steel, did spur me forth;
And not all love to see you, though so much
As might have drawn one to a longer voyage,
But jealousy what might befall your travel,
Being skilless in these parts; which to a stranger,
Unguided and unfriended, often prove
Rough and unhospitable: my willing love,
The rather by these arguments of fear,
Set forth in your pursuit.
Antonio (Twelfth Night, Act III scene iii)

leupagus:

In 2011, Dutch photographer Charlotte Dumas embarked on a quest to locate the last surviving 9/11 search and rescue dogs who had worked so tirelessly ten years earlier. Retrieved is a collection of their portraits, a moving tribute to these heroic dogs and their handlers.

NOPE

stunningpicture:

A seahorse admiring his own reflection from a divers watch

stunningpicture:

A seahorse admiring his own reflection from a divers watch